The Story So Far . . .

Welcome once again to the seventeenth century. It’s a different time than what you read about in your history books, because a cosmic accident put 3500 West Virginians and their small town of Grantville splat down in the Thuringerwald in 1631. Once again, the Grantville Gazette will chronicle what happens when twentieth-century Americans and American culture crash into the cultures of Early Modern Europe—in fact, the entire world.

Kerryn Offord, co-author of the wildly popular Chronicles of Dr. Gribbleflotz, here serves up a story about what happens when bureaucracy is left unchecked, in “Your Tax Dollars at Work.”

Mike Watson gives us a little Old West in the new east with “Greetings,” while Eric S. Brown and Anna Carpenter give us a new installment in the story of LARPers in Grantville with “The Lost Monster.”

In our Serials department, David Carrico continues his story, “Etude,” and Nick Lorance gives us another Sergeant Whatsisname story in “The Long Road Home.”

In Nonfiction, we have another installment of “About the Faces on the Cutting Room Floor” where Chuck Gannon looks at the making of sausage, er, fiction. Szántai Gábor brings forth another installment of his social history of Hungary and Transylvania in the seventeenth century. And Kristine Kathryn Rusch gives us another “Notes from the Buffer Zone.”

Garrett Vance provides us part three of “First Cavalry of the Cretaceous,” and we have an Annex story this month from Debi Carroll called “Spitting Image.”

So come on in, and enjoy your visit to Grantville and the seventeenth century!

 

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One thought on “The Story So Far . . .

  1. Bill Scott

    I’m catching up!!
    My 5-star at Goodreads and Baen:
    An excellent selection of short stories and supporting non-fiction about late 20th century Grantville, WV Americans in 17th century Germany. My favorite fiction selections were Etude Part 2 (Carrico), The Long Road Home (Lorance), and Spitting Image (Carroll, non-ROF). Gabor Szantai’s Hungary and Transylvania Part 2 is particularly helpful in understanding the dynamics of central and eastern Europe in the 17th century.

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