The Story So Far . . .

Wahoo! Welcome to the wide, wide world of the seventeenth century, with this issue of the Grantville Gazette! Don’t worry that the train only has one rail, we’ll explain that later. Jump on and hang on.

First, we have “The Mark of the Lion,” by Kerryn Offord–what you must do to win a Medal of Honor.

Our peripatetic young journeyman walks again, in “These Boots Are Made for Walking,” by Thomas Scot, and that’s just what they do.

Michael Lockwood’s “The Traitor’s Oath” continues the story of the travails of English Puritans in the now-French colonies that were New England. Will they get away to the help of the Mohicans? Will they get to Grantville?

Tim Sayeau’s story of the little girl who might grow up to be a monster continues in “Protecting the Seed.” In the New Time Line, are people predestined to be what they were in the Original Time Line, or can they be changed by environment and events? Is it nature, or is it nurture?

I said we’d talk about a railroad with one rail, and that’s what happens in Kevin and Karen Evans’ story of a young Welshman, Daffyd Gough, who gets some brilliant ideas while convalescing in Jena’s University Hospital. He takes them home, and gets his mother to invest in a blast furnace. And then it goes downhill on a single rail!

We have, in non-fiction, Iver Cooper’s “Secret Communications, Part 2,” about spies and such like, and how they communicate with each other without getting caught. Cybersecurity is older than you might think.

We have Kris Rusch’s meditation on becoming an Old Fart. I completely identify with this one.

And we have the latest installment in “The Company…” by Edward M. Lerner. This one is “The Company Mole, Part 1.”

Last, but still great, we’ll have the news from Eric Flint’s Ring of Fire Press on books forthcoming. We have some great books coming out between now and Christmas, so get your lists ready!

Please fasten your seat belts as the train begins to leave the station. The steam whistle sounds as we chug onto the mainline into the seventeenth century. All aboard!

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