Letters From Gronow, Episode 2

Magdeburg

 

From the Journal of Philip Fröhlich

 

19 November 1634

 

Sunday

Breakfast–

Fasted

Lunch–

1 sausage 2 pfennigs

1 wheat roll 3 pfennigs

Supper–

1 barley roll 2 quartered pfennigs

1 wurst 2 pfennigs

1 mug beer 1 pfennig

 

Have not written in journal other than noting expenses since Wednesday afternoon.

 

No dreams last night.  No dreams since Tuesday night.

 

Forced myself to go to church today.  Didn’t want to go.  Haven’t wanted to get out of bed since Wednesday.  Haven’t wanted to do anything since Wednesday.  The message from Herr Gronow crushed me.  I had so hoped that I would see my story in Der Schwarze Kater, and it left me broken when it was rejected.

 

Herr Schiller noticed it, and asked me what was wrong.  All I could do was shake my head.

 

Even Martin could tell something was amiss, and found the courage or the charity to ask what was wrong and if he could do anything.  Again, all I could do was shake my head.

 

Thursday.  Friday.  Saturday.  Broken inside.  Avoided Syborg’s Books.  Came home.  Ate bites of bread that were dry as dust and bitter as wormwood.  Sat in the dark until sleep overcame me.  Offered meaningless prayers.

 

Today, didn’t want to go to church.  Pulled the blanket over my head and resisted getting up so strongly, but a voice in the back of my mind—my conscience, my guardian angel, my patron saint, who knows—told me that it was when I least want to assemble with the body as St. Paul instructed that I most need to.  I could not argue with that, and so, slowly, reluctantly, I forced myself to arise, and wash, and don my best clothing.

 

At church the music seemed dreary, and I did not sing.  The reading was meaningless to me, and I did not listen.  Then came the homily, from old Pastor Gruber who sometimes fills the pulpit at St. Jacob’s.  The leaders really need to appoint a new pastor for us.  I know the church is small and poor, but we need a regular pastor as much as the other churches do.

 

Pastor Gruber talked about making our lives a pleasing offering to the Lord.  He talked about how craftsmen and artists and musicians spend years learning and practicing and honing their crafts and arts and skills so they could make things of beauty.  He even talked about a famous musician from the future of Grantville, one of the greatest musicians ever, who wrote “Soli Deo Gloria”—For the Glory of God Alone—on the manuscripts of his greatest works.  He ended by quoting a verse from Ecclesiastes.  He said, “Whatsoever thy hand finds to do, do it with all thy might.”

 

It was like I woke up.  It was like Herr Schiller slapped the back of my head and said, “Pay attention!”  After that moment, I could only think of that verse, even after church as I was eating my lunch.

 

When I got home, I read through Ecclesiastes in my Bible until I found the verse in chapter 9, and it said exactly what Pastor Gruber had said.

 

Thought about that the rest of the day, even as I read a few more pages from The City of God, and as I ate supper.

 

Decided that I was a writer—that I am a writer—and if it takes me years to learn my art, so be it.  Herr Gronow will be my judge, but always Soli Deo Gloria.

 

Recited evening prayers.  And now to bed.

 

****

 

From the Journal of Philip Fröhlich

 

20 November 1634

 

Monday

Breakfast/lunch–

2 barley rolls 1 pfennig

1 cup small beer 1 quartered pfennig

Supper–

1 wurst 1 pfennig

2 mugs beer 1 pfennig

 

Vague recollections of dreams, but obviously nothing strong if can’t recall them.

 

Felt better at work.  Caught Herr Schiller looking at me with his eyebrows raised.  When I grinned at him, he nodded and returned to his work.

 

Reviewed last week’s work.  Only found one error on one of Martin’s pages.  None on mine, which I don’t understand how that is.  I was so lost after Wednesday.  Deo gratias, nonetheless.  Herr Schiller must be in a good mood, because when I showed him the error, he didn’t shout at Martin or beat him with the ferrule, he just told him to copy the page over.

 

At the end of the day, told Herr Schiller that I wanted to take today’s pay in candle stubs and quill feathers—left wing ones, because they’re cheaper.  He didn’t quite frown, but asked me why.  Told him I’m going to be a writer, and I need to practice my writing so that the editor will take my work.  At that, his eyebrows went up again, but he just said, “St. Paul guide your hand, then,” and let me pick my own quills.

 

Tonight I took Herr Gronow’s letter and practiced writing some of the words from it.  This may take longer than I thought it would.  Endure.  Persevere.  Perfect.

 

Recited evening prayers.  And now to bed.

 

****

 

From the Journal of Philip Fröhlich

 

21 November 1634

 

Tuesday

Breakfast–

1 barley roll (old) 1 quartered pfennig

Supper–

1 barley roll 2 quartered pfennigs

1 cup small beer 1 quartered pfennig

 

Dreams last night were strange.

 

Posted Master Gröning’s cash entries today.  Looked odd.  Not very many entries, but one of them was large.

 

Otherwise did what Herr Schiller told me to do.

 

Did ask Herr Schiller if I could help with the writing that has to be done.  He gave me a funny look.  Told him it had been so long since I had written regularly, that I was afraid I was going to forget how.  He laughed, then said that the hand I had learned in school was probably different than what was used by the factors and merchants and masters like Master Gröning.  I said I would try.  He gave me an old letter and some scrap paper.  Wasn’t so different from what I saw in school or what Herr Gronow’s letter looked like.  Spent the rest of the day at copying parts of the old letter, showed the best of it to Herr Schiller, he nodded and said I might be useful at that.

 

Went home.  Re-read part of the new volume of Der Schwarze Kater, looked at the last page where it says how to send stories to Herr Gronow.  Looked different.  Got out the first volume, compared the two pages.  It is different.  And now I know why Herr Gronow did not send my story back to me.

 

Took a deep breath.  Recited evening prayers.  Now to bed.

 

****

 

From Der Schwarze Kater, Volume 2

 

Black Tomcat Magazine Submissions

 

We recommend you keep a personal copy of your story.  All submissions become the personal property of the publisher upon receipt, and will not be returned, regardless of ultimate decision about publication.  Allow for six months of mail and processing time before querying as to the publication decision.

 

****

 

From the Journal of Philip Fröhlich

 

22 November 1634

 

Wednesday

Breakfast–

none

Supper–

2 barley rolls 1 pfennig

1 cup small beer 1 quartered pfennig

 

Dreams last night.  Woke up twice.

 

Overslept this morning.  Somehow the church bells didn’t wake me.  No breakfast.  Threw on clothes, ran through streets, down alleys, jumped a fence to run across a lot and jumped another fence on other side, arrived at work just after Herr Schiller had unlocked doors and entered.  Came in on heels of Martin.  Herr Schiller raised one eyebrow when he saw me, but shook his head and said nothing.

 

Martin was set to logging the orders today.  Watched over him for a while, then started doing the cash entries.  More of them than usual again.  Said that to Herr Schiller.  He nodded, said that the war was creating opportunities.

 

Reminded Herr S about wanting to write more.  He pulled a document out of the stack on his desk, told me to make a copy.  Six pages!  Spent rest of day copying it, only got first two pages done.  Think he did that on purpose.  Lots of words I did not know.

 

Starting writing my story again tonight, with ink.  Being careful about letters.  Taking longer the second time because of that, and because I have to stop and think after every few sentences about what I had done in the story or how I had said things.  Understand now why I should keep a copy for myself, but that’s going to almost double the time it takes to prepare a story.  But I need to know what I’ve done, and no one in Magdeburg has any of the incredible Grantville machines that can automatically make pages of book stuff.  Which is too bad.  I think that must be really neat.

 

Read parts of the new Der Schwarze Kater again.  The other stories are good, but not as good as Herr Poe or Herr Lovecraft.  I shiver when I read their work.  I am not as good as the others, but I will be one day.  I will be better, one day.  Maybe not as good as Herren Poe and Lovecraft.  But to be almost as good as them would be a fine thing.

 

Recited evening prayers, and now to bed.

 

****

 

From the Journal of Philip Fröhlich

 

24 November 1634

 

Friday

Breakfast–

1 barley roll (old) 1 quartered pfennig

1 cup small beer 2 quartered pfennigs

Supper–

1 barley roll 2 quartered pfennigs

1 cup small beer 1 quartered pfennig

Had dreams last night.  Woke up thrice, gasping.

 

Martin was logging more orders today.  I made some cash entries, then finished the last two pages of the document Herr Schiller told me to copy.  He looked at it, pointed out words where my hand was not regular, told me to copy it again.  All of it.  Joy.

 

Did ask him what the words I didn’t know mean.  He told me some of them, told me the rest were lawyer’s words and even he wasn’t sure what they meant.  Seems like it would be a fine thing to be a lawyer and get to use words that other people don’t know.

 

Looked at what I’ve been writing when I got home tonight, decided my hand with the story wasn’t any better than my hand at work.  Started over with that as well.  Joy.

 

Recited evening prayers.  Now to bed.

 

****

 

From the Journal of Philip Fröhlich

 

10 December 1634

 

Sunday

Breakfast–

Fasted

Lunch-

1 sausage 2 pfennigs

1 wheat roll 3 pfennigs

Supper–

1 barley roll 2 quartered pfennigs

1 wurst 2 pfennigs

1 mug beer 1 pfennig

 

No dreams last night that I remember, although I woke up a bit weary.

 

Went to church at St. Jacob’s this morning.  Music was better than usual, but I would have sung anyway.  Reading was for Advent.  Couldn’t help but think that Herod was a greater monster than anything from the minds of Herren Poe and Lovecraft.

 

Homily was by Pastor Gruber again.  I like him.  He’s pretty old—white hair, anyway—and his mind wanders a bit, and his voice keeps getting softer every time he preaches, but his homilies are always interesting, and about people, instead of just about big theology words.  I know the theology is important, but sometimes I just need to hear how people are supposed to be.  Including me.

 

Read more of The City of God.  Does anyone really understand St. Augustine?  I’ll keep trying.  Johann is having trouble getting it all into my head.  Not sure he really understands it, though.

 

After having started my story over twice, I think my hand at writing is finally where it needs to be.  Herr Schiller said as much for the latest document he had me write.  So when I get this version done, I’ll be ready to submit it back to Herr Gronow.  After I make a copy for myself, that is.

 

Recited evening prayers, and now to bed.

 

****

 

From the Journal of Philip Fröhlich

 

13 December 1634

 

Wednesday

Breakfast–

1 barley roll 2 quartered pfennigs

1 cup small beer 1 quartered pfennig

Supper–

2 barley rolls 1 pfennig

1 cup small beer 1 quartered pfennig

Woke up sweating.  Usually means I dreamt, even though I don’t remember any.

 

Herr Schiller had me copying documents all day, new documents these were, that I hadn’t seen before.  Some new words I hadn’t seen before in them, but when I asked Herr S about them he said they were more lawyer words and to just copy them as they were.  The amount of money mentioned in them made me gulp.  I didn’t know anyone had that much money, even Master Gröning.  But he wasn’t the only person mentioned, so it must be something they’re all sharing in, or something.  Still, had to concentrate extra hard to keep my hand steady for a while.

 

Stopped at Syborg’s Books after work.  Herr Matthias himself was there and greeted me with a smile.  He asked me if I was still reading St. Augustine.  I said yes, and that I was still struggling with it.  He laughed, and said so was he.  I asked him if there was going to be another book of Der Schwarze Kater, and he said yes, but probably not until February.

 

So I need to start saving my pfennigs now, to have my two dollars ready when the next book comes out.

 

Maybe I can have my new story turned in before that.  Wouldn’t it be fine to see it in those pages?

 

Recited evening prayers, and now to bed.

 

****

 

From the Journal of Philip Fröhlich

 

16 December 1634

 

Saturday

Breakfast/lunch–

2 barley rolls 1 pfennig

1 cup small beer 1 quartered pfennig

Supper–

1 wurst 2 pfennigs

1 mug beer 1 pfennig

 

Dreamt I was sitting in a classroom and St. Augustine was teaching.  Woke up in the middle of him about to apply the ferrule because I couldn’t explain The City of God.  Was really glad that I woke up.

 

Herr Schiller told me today that he was going to make me clerk over the contracts and agreements, and I would have to keep them straight and organized and make all the copies and things.  It will also raise my pay by two dollars a day.  I will be getting twelve dollars a day starting next Monday.  That means I’ll be able to buy the next Der Schwarze Kater and still eat something every day.  That will be nice.

 

Was so excited about that it was hard to concentrate on finishing the story, but I was able to do that tonight.  All done, and in my best hand.  And I think I spelled the words right—or at least the same way.  Something to thank God for in church tomorrow.

 

Recited evening prayers.  Now to bed.

 

****

 

From the Journal of Philip Fröhlich

 

18 December 1634

 

Monday

Breakfast-

2 barley rolls 1 pfennig

1 cup small beer 1 quartered pfennig

Supper–

1 sausage 2 pfennigs

1 cup small beer 1 quartered pfennig

 

First day as contracts clerk.  Had to make copies of two agreements.  Had to find them first.  What a mess.  Going to have to figure out how to make sense out of the contracts.  All scattered around, all in different drawers and stacks and kinds of folders.  Hard to make sense, even harder to find.  Now I know why he wanted me to become the clerk.  Scheisse.  I mean, I know that’s rude and vulgar and St. Paul says not to be that way, but honestly . . .

 

Also had to review the entries from last week.  No errors.  Herr Schiller was pleased by that.

 

Martin is doing pretty well.  Not sure he’s going to be able to keep up with everything after I start spending more time on contracts, though.

 

Started writing out my copy of my story tonight.  Slow going, because I want it to be as good as the original that I will give to Herr Gronow.  Don’t have to think as much about what to write, but keeping my mind on the copying is just as hard as copying a contract, even though I wrote what I’m copying.  Haven’t figured out why, yet.

 

Read The Fall of the House of Usher from the second Der Schwarze Kater again tonight.  Even though I have read it at least twice before, Herr Poe still strikes sparks in my soul.  Will I ever be able to touch someone like he touches me?  I don’t know.  I hope so.  To know that I can touch another soul with my words and make them feel what I feel, that would be wonderful.

 

But enough for tonight.  Recited evening prayers.  Now to bed.

 

****

 

From the Journal of Philip Fröhlich

 

21 December 1634

 

Thursday

Breakfast-

2 barley rolls 1 pfennig

1 mug beer 1 pfennig

Supper–

1 wurst 2 pfennigs

1 mug beer 1 pfennig

 

Dreams last night, mostly running with someone chasing me.  Didn’t get caught, but was sweating again when I woke up.

 

Have set aside the two dollars for the next Der Schwarze Kater.  Able to afford more food after paying the rent, paying a tithe to the church, and putting a little back for an emergency and for a new coat.  This one is about to unweave itself, it is so old and so threadbare.  It’s like it invites the wind to come in rather than holds it off.  If I wanted to, I could probably net fish out of the river with it.  Mother would be ashamed to see me in it.

 

Finished figuring out what I want—or need—to do to get Master Gröning’s contracts and agreements organized.  Had a long talk with Herr Schiller about it.  He finally agreed, but really resisted at first because he didn’t want to spend the money for the new folders and labels and shelves.  Not going to list the details here, but it’s going to take some work to get everything pulled together and sorted and put in new folders and labeled.

 

Almost halfway done in copying my story, but it’s going slow.  Have been really tired in the evenings this week.  Haven’t even gone by Syborg’s Books.  May have to try the coffee I hear everyone talking about, but it’s so expensive.

 

Done for the night.  Recited evening prayers.  Now to bed.

 

****

 

From the Journal of Philip Fröhlich

 

22 December 1634

 

Friday

Breakfast-

1 sausage 2 pfennigs

1 mug beer 1 pfennig

Supper–

1 wheat roll 3 pfennigs

1 mug beer 1 pfennig

 

Dreams last night.  Dreamt I was flying through the air, arms spread out like wings.  Could look down and see Magdeburg below.  Could tell it was Magdeburg because of the river and the Dom.  Wonder if angels look down on us like that?  That would be so fine a thing, to see the world from the eye of a soaring bird—an eagle, maybe, or a raven or cuckoo.

 

Herr Schiller announced that Master Gröning had decided to follow the up-time practice of closing for Christmas Day.  Will enjoy the day, attending the mass at St. Jacob’s.  Will miss the pay, though.

 

Herr Schiller brought a small gift for Martin and I:  a full clump of raisins for each of us, still on the stem of the bunches just like they were when they were grapes.  I tried a few.  They were tough and chewy, but sweet, so sweet.  It was all I could do to not devour them all right then, as Martin did.  I wrapped the rest of mine in my kerchief and brought them home.  I shall try to only eat a few at a time, so that I can savor them for a long time.  So sweet, even with the crunchy seeds in them.

 

Read Matthew Chapter 1 tonight.  Will read Luke Chapter 2 tomorrow.  Will probably hear one or the other as the reading at mass Sunday, but that’s fine.

 

Spent some time copying my story.  Almost done with the copy.

 

Just ate a couple of raisins.

 

Recited evening prayers.  Now to bed.

 

****

 

From the Journal of Philip Fröhlich

 

24 December 1634

 

Sunday

Breakfast–

Fasted

Lunch-

1 sausage 2 pfennigs

2 wheat rolls 5 pfennigs

1 mug beer 1 pfennig

Supper–

1 barley roll 2 quartered pfennigs

1 wurst 2 pfennigs

1 mug beer 1 pfennig

 

Dreams last night.  Awoke twice, but don’t really remember them.

 

Attended St. Jacob’s this morning.  Music was pretty good, but it usually is during Advent.  Sang with a will.  Reading was for Advent again—or still, I should say.  Homily was not as good as Pastor Gruber’s last homily.  Found myself thinking about Joseph, the husband of Mary.  He must have been an unusual man.

 

Read five pages in The City of God this afternoon.  Either I’m starting to figure St. Augustine out, or that was a section where he took it easy on the readers, because I think I may have understood what he was trying to say.  Which means I probably have it all wrong.  Will have to wait until Johann returns to Magdeburg from his trip to find out.

 

Ended up falling asleep in the middle of the sixth page.  Woke up when the Vespers bells were ringing.

 

Copied half a page of the story.  Have decided to wait until after Epiphany to send my story to Herr Gronow.  I’m sure he’s a busy man during the holidays, and I would rather have his full attention.  I think.  Maybe.  Surely.

 

Can’t keep my eyes open.

 

Recited evening prayers.  Now to bed.

 

****

 

From the Journal of Philip Fröhlich

 

28 December 1634

 

Thursday

Breakfast-

1 wheat roll 3 pfennigs

1 mug beer 1 pfennig

Supper–

1 wurst 2 pfennigs

1 mug beer 1 pfennig

 

Dreams last night.  Woke up at least twice.  Don’t remember them, though.  Frustrating.

 

Martin came to work today.  Got sick not long after he came in.  Herr Schiller managed to get him to the door before he puked.  Then he shat his pants, nasty watery stuff from the stain it left.  Herr Schiller threw a few pfennigs at him and told him not to come back until he was well.  Hope whatever he has is not catching.  According to the up-timers, it is important to keep clean when sickness is around.  Found some soap and took a little of our water to wash my hands.  No towel, so had to wipe my hands on my trousers.  Cold, but if it keeps my guts in place, worth it.  Herr Schiller saw what I was doing, and came and did the same thing.

 

So, ended up doing Martin’s work instead of mine today.  Or maybe I should say alongside mine, as I still had to do at least a few contract things in addition to all the entries.  Herr Schiller gave me a couple of extra pfennigs at the end of the day.  Should have been more, but I’ll take what he can give.

 

Stopped at Syborg’s Books on the way home.  According to Georg, the next book of Der Schwarze Kater is still going to be published in February.  Frustrating.  Want it NOW!  Came home and re-read parts of the first one.  Wish I could mend the torn pages.  I know that’s why I got it so cheaply, but I would really like to fix them before they get damaged more.  I keep hearing about up-time stuff called ‘tape’, but probably isn’t available in Magdeburg, and would probably cost a lot more than I can afford.

 

Finished copying my story.  Compared it to the original version.  Didn’t see any differences.  Just waiting for Epiphany now.

 

Ate some raisins.

 

Recited evening prayers.  Now to bed.

 

****

 

From the Journal of Philip Fröhlich

 

5 January 1635

 

Friday

Breakfast–

1 wheat roll 3 pfennigs

1 mug beer 1 pfennig

Supper–

1 sausage 2 pfennigs

1 mug beer 1 pfennig

 

Martin came back to work today.  He is very pale and skinny, but seems able to work.  I will have to review his work closely, I think.  But because he was there, I was able to spend a lot of time working on the contracts.  Got a bunch of them put in their new folders and labeled and put in their right places on the shelves.  Starting to make a difference in how the office looks, to not have piles of contracts just lying around.

 

Epiphany Eve tonight.  Had the story with me, tucked inside my shirt.  Address and stuff was on it.  After work, ran to the building where Herr Gronow’s office is.  The door was closed and locked again, which did not surprise me.  The slot was still cut in the door, and it still had the sign above it that says “Submissions,” so the story went into the slot.  And just like last time, as soon as I let go of it I wanted to take it back, but too late.  So I leaned against the door and prayed about it again.

 

Ate supper on the way home.

 

When I returned to my room I treated myself to The Dunwich Horror.  Very fine.

 

Trying not to worry about my story.  Hard.

 

Recited evening prayers.  Now to bed.

 

****

 

From the Journal of Philip Fröhlich

 

12 January 1635

 

Friday

Breakfast–

1 barley roll 2 quartered pfennigs

1 sausage 2 pfennigs

1 mug beer 1 pfennig

Supper–

1 wurst 2 pfennigs

1 mug beer 1 pfennig

 

No dreams last night.  Was still nervous when I awoke.

 

Was right to be nervous.  Today a messenger stepped inside the office.  Same one as last time.  Herr Schiller held out his hand, but the messenger shook his head and said, “Herr Philip Fröhlich.”

 

Herr Schiller waved his hand at me and turned back to his ledger.  The messenger stepped over to hand me an envelope before he ducked his head in a bow and left.

 

Herr Schiller said nothing, but when he looked back at me his face had a bit of a frown on it.  So like last time, I stuffed it inside my shirt and got back to work.  I didn’t open the message until I got back to my room.

 

****

 

10 January 1635

 

Herr Philip Fröhlich

 

It appears to me that you are going to be persistent.  I can admire that in a man.  It is, however, better to have something worthwhile to be persistent about.

 

I have received your most recent submission of a purported story for consideration of publication in Der Schwarze Kater.  It is an improvement over your previous submission.  I can at least read this one.  Mostly.  Your use of the local secretary hand is acceptable.  You executing it in very small size, I assume so you can get as many lines on a page as possible, is not.  Nor is filling the page from edge to edge, top to bottom and side to side.  I am not going to ruin my eyesight trying to read this.

 

I see I must educate you on the practicalities of writing for a publisher.

 

When you submit a story, you are making a presentation to the publisher, in much the same way that an artist or a musician is making a presentation to a patron.  It should represent your best work, and should be done so well as to make as good an impression as possible.  You want to make it easy for the publisher to read it.  The more things you do that hinder the reading of the work, the less likely the publisher is to buy your work—as you have now discovered twice.

 

So, first of all, use good quality octavo-sized paper of the same size no larger than eight inches wide by ten inches high.  I found the multiplicity of paper sizes in your submission to be confusing at best and irritating at worst.

 

Second, space the lines at least 1/4 inch apart—3/8 inch would be better.

 

Third, leave blank margins of about one inch on all sides of each page.

 

I did not read the story.  A few things caught my eye as I looked over the pages, though.  It appears that your spelling has improved.  Alas, it is now more evident that your grammar also needs work.  I refer you again to the Bible as translated by Martin Luther.  Model your grammar on his.

 

Finally, your title, “The Perils of Portia”—to quote the up-timers, lose it.  Think of a better title.

 

I again hesitate to say this, but if you can correct the issues in your story noted above, you may resubmit it.

 

Good day to you.

 

Johann Gronow

Editor and Publisher

Der Schwarze Kater

****

About David Carrico

David 2013-03-03 smallDavid Carrico made his first professional SF sale to The Grantville Gazette e-magazine in 2004. His stories have also appeared in the Grantville Gazette and Ring of Fire anthologies from Baen Books and in Jim Baen’s Universe e-magazine. Baen Books have published a story collection by David entitled 1635: Music and Murder, and two novels written in collaboration with Eric Flint: 1636: The Devil’s Opera and The Span of Empire. David is currently working on a solo project.

4 thoughts on “Letters From Gronow, Episode 2

  1. leegibson

    A big fan of Lovecraft and the whole Arkham House thing here, ever since Graduate school in the late 60s when some of the original series were still on library shelves. Still listing for the mindless piping of a distant flute held in nameless paws far, far beyond the rim of the known universe ( but with lots of adjectives! )
    Hope our young Bob Crachet can get more sauerkraut to improve his vitamin and fiber intake in the little ice age winter. Btw see what happens to your readers after an hour without first person subject indicators.
    Lee

  2. Lorraine Rovig

    Bread, meat, and beer get a mention in his diary because they cost money. Does he not mention vegetables because they just “come with” meat in that time period with no added charge–like everyone knows sausage comes with sauerkraut, onion, and dark mustard? Are vegetables too unimportant to list in his accounting of daily cost? Why does he never list the common low-cost foods of soup or porridge?

    He is getting vitamins somewhere in the months of time period covered or he would be too tired to work and likely ill.

    Thank you for your new story, new characters, and new dilemma, David. I find I’m as interested in learning that time period’s values and practices through reading the stories in “The Grantville Gazette” as I am in seeing German downtimers changing as their time period is invaded/infected/enlivened/educated/changed by bumping into USA uptimers. So, another thank you – for all the research you must be doing into the minutiae of life there and then.

    1. David Carrico

      Philip is a poor worker working a low paying job. A balanced diet, if he even understands the concept, is not his highest priority at this immediate point. It is a plot element, though, so stay tuned. 🙂

      David

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