Vol. 72, Jul 2017

Read Me First . . .

By Walt Boyes

Welcome to the July issue of The Grantville Gazette! I'm your friendly tour guide to the wonders and sometimes head-shaking strangeness of the Ring of Fire. You would think that we are in love with the fiction of David Carrico by how many of his stories appear in this issue. And you'd be right. He [...]

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1632 Fiction

By Iver P. Cooper

Fall, 1634 Gulf of Cadiz, Spanish Coast   The wind was from the southwest as the fishing boat Estrella del Este approached the mouth of the Guadalquivir River. On their right stood the town of Sanlucar de Barrameda, at which the great ships of the flota, the Spanish treasure fleet, were loaded and unloaded. On [...]

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By Phillip Riviezzo

Night, May, 1636 A Road near Vesserhausen   She woke up. This was not strange, because Greta slept a lot when she was not dancing. She was in her wooden den, and it was moving. This was also not strange—when her den was moving, it meant she could rest, and would not have to dance [...]

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By David Carrico

Magdeburg May 12, 1635   Augustus Nero Domitian 'Andy' Wulff looked out his window with a sense of satisfaction. The glazier and the window frame maker had finally gotten two fairly large panes of glass floated and cut and assembled in the frames and installed in his new office. They weren't quite as smooth and [...]

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Continuing Serials

By David Carrico

Magdeburg     From the Journal of Philip Fröhlich   14 January 1635   Sunday Breakfast– Fasted Lunch- 1 sausage 2 pfennigs 1 wheat roll 3 pfennigs Supper– 1 cup sauerkraut 2 quartered pfennigs 1 wurst 2 pfennigs 1 mug beer 1 pfennig   Only noted expenses yesterday. Was dealing with message rejecting story.   [...]

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By Mike Watson

VI   Mid-October, 1634 Suhl   I wish I'd thought to bring a gavel. Pat Johnson had rented a room to hold the first official meeting of the consortium. The room contained a long table encircled with cushioned chairs. One side of the room contained windows providing enough light that lamps weren't needed. On the [...]

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1632 Nonfiction

By Charles E. Gannon & David Carrico

Time May Change Me, But I Can't Trace Time By Charles E. Gannon, Ph.D., and David Carrico (with props/apologies to David Bowie for the title)     (This is the first of several possible articles that will grow out of a series of discussions among the members of the Grantville Gazette extended editorial board.)   [...]

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By Iver P. Cooper

Our up-time characters are in Little Ice Age Europe now, and hence neither their experience with twentieth-century American agriculture nor their limited literature on twentieth-century European agriculture are a completely reliable guide as to what crops will grow where. The effect of the Ring of Fire on climate is also somewhat uncertain.   Airship lift [...]

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Columns

By Walt Boyes

This year, the Minicon was bigger and better than ever. This was because the Balticon concom asked Joy Ward, the co-editor of Eric Flint's Ring of Fire Press and a Gazette author, to produce four days of panels and activities instead of our normal two. Joy put together a terrific program, which had to be [...]

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By Kristine Kathryn Rusch

Notes from The Buffer Zone: Wonder Woman Kristine Kathryn Rusch   For the first time in my life, I cried through a superhero movie. I should probably say, in fairness to me, that I'm a pretty easy crier, especially when faced with stories or something particularly heartwarming. When I was a typically moody tween, I [...]

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By Garrett W. Vance

This Issue’s Cover – 72   Ode to the Legal Pad   Sometimes it's the little things.   While reading David Carrico's very amusing 'Whodunnit?' I was struck by the following passage, the feelings of a downtimer lawyer toward the new uptime technology he has embraced:   "Andy pulled one of his beloved legal pads [...]

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Time Spike

No articles Found

Universe Annex

By Domenic diCiacca

Van Meer rose from the ground like a ghost from a tomb. It was not yet dawn, cold and black beneath the trees. Frost was thin this deep in the forest, but there was a snap to the air and Van Meer's breath condensed on his mustache and beard. He walked among his stacked stones [...]

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