Current Issue

The Story So Far . . .

Welcome once again to the seventeenth century. It’s a different time than what you read about in your history books, because a cosmic accident put 3500 West Virginians and their small town of Grantville splat down in the Thuringerwald in 1631. Once again, the Grantville Gazette will chronicle what happens when twentieth-century Americans and American [...]
  

Your Tax Dollars At Work

The early hours of Sunday morning, February 1636, western West Virginia County   It was a perfect moonlit night for Dieter Burkhard’s purposes. There was just enough light that he could see what he was doing, but not so much that others could see him doing it. The gate into the storage yard of Schubert’s [...]
  

Greetings!

Early Spring, 1633 Under most circumstances, Harley Thomas was an even-tempered man—slow to get riled and slow to cool down. It was early morning, before dawn, as he peered into the steamed mirror. He wiped a final trace of beard from his face. The harsh lye soap caused the small cuts to sting. He rinsed [...]
  

The Lost Monster

The glass of the diner’s window shattered, crashing in shards to the floor. The tempting smell of cooking hamburgers on the grill was replaced by the overwhelming stench of raw sewage. Outside, in the street, their yellow eyes burning in the night, the monsters roared. Then, the screen went black, and the credits began to [...]
  

Etude, Part 2

It was evening, and Johann and his brothers had just stepped into The Green Horse. He was chewing the last of a piece of sausage he had bought from a street vendor who had been about to close for the evening. His hand was greasy, so he wiped it on the seat of his trousers. [...]
  

The Long Road Home, Part 1

The Battle of Ahrensbök Early May, 1634   From where the French command group stood, what had been a glorious struggle became tragedy. With the cavalry along with their commanding general in flight, Charles de la Porte threw his men into the attack hoping they could at least break through. The armies closed together, and [...]
  

About the Faces on the Cutting Room Floor, Number Six: Pirates as Prey

Much of the second half of 1635: The Papal Stakes involves defeating, avoiding, even stealing resources from, the plentiful pirates of the seventeenth-century Mediterranean. And while all the main scenes involving these scrapes and adventures were retained, some of the lesser ones could not be kept, even though characters referred to them. This truncated story-telling [...]
  

Hungary and Transylvania, Part 2: The Lay of the Land: The Neighbors and the Inhabitants

When talking about Hungary and Transylvania, basically and historically we mean one country that used to fill the Carpathian Basin with a corridor to the Adriatic Sea through Croatia. The valleys of the Danube and the Tisza Rivers provided very rich fields and pastures while the huge Carpathian Mountains protected the land on three sides [...]
  
So Fan-Girl

Notes from The Buffer Zone: Exciting Times

I sat down to write this column about a week after I taught a class for professional writers covering history, time travel, and alternate history. One of the biggest lessons I felt I needed to impart was that just because something “new” hit in a certain year didn’t mean that everyone adapted to that thing [...]
  

This Issue’s Cover – 68

This Issue’s Cover – 68 This cover was inspired by Mike Watson’s story Greetings! Please note that Gazette art is not considered canon, and this is simply the artist’s interpretation of what a USE Marshal’s badge might look like, based on historical US Marshal’s badges. Cheers, Garrett
  

The First Cavalry of the Cretaceous, Part Three: Demons in the Air

Gonzalo stood on the wide, shady porch of his Spanish-style mud brick home, watching the tall figure of Nate Tucker ambling across the meadow. It was a familiar sight, but one he hadn’t seen for more than a week. “Hello, my friend!” he called out cheerfully to the Texan. “How is married life treating you?” [...]
  

Spitting Image

The Ozumi Transfer Protocol was 64% complete when Michael Cienega blinked into consciousness like a sputtering light bulb. The sinuses of his chassis tickled with vibration from the neuroprinter. He tried to reach for the spindle jacked into the base of its skull, but its arm didn’t move. No motor function, not with only 64% [...]