Edward M. Lerner

 

Author and technologist Edward M. Lerner worked in computer engineering and aerospace for thirty years, as everything from engineer to senior vice president, for much of that time writing science fiction as his hobby. Since 2004 he has written full-time.

 

His novels range from near-future technothrillers, like Small Miracles and Energized, to traditional SF, like Dark Secret and his InterstellarNet series, to (collaborating with Larry Niven) the space-opera epic Fleet of Worlds series of Ringworld companion novels. Lerner's 2015 novel, InterstellarNet: Enigma, won the inaugural Canopus Award "honoring excellence in interstellar writing." His fiction has also been nominated for Locus, Prometheus, and Hugo awards.

 

Lerner's short fiction has appeared in anthologies, collections, and many of the usual SF magazines. He also writes about science and technology, most recently Trope-ing the Light Fantastic: The Science Behind the Fiction.

 

His website is edwardmlerner.com.

Website

The Company Mole, Part 2

The Company Mole, Part 2

In “The Company Man” (May 2017 issue), our eponymous hero, a Belter forensic accountant, finds himself in the wrong place at the wrong time. A mysterious something (chemical? bacterial? nanite infestation?) is about to be released into the underground habitat at a...
The Company Mole, Part 1

The Company Mole, Part 1

What has gone before . . .   In “The Company Man” (May 2017 issue), our eponymous hero, a Belter forensic accountant, finds himself in the wrong place at the wrong time. A mysterious something (chemical? bacterial? nanite infestation?) is about to be released...
The Company Dick

The Company Dick

In a drug-induced fog, my head pounding, I woke flat on my back in an unfamiliar, windowless place. With a herculean effort, I managed to lift my head. The room was without furniture except for the mildewy, armless, too-short sofa across which I had been dumped, and...
The Company Man

The Company Man

Working for paranoids isn't the easiest or the safest way to make a living, but it paid well. It even appeared that I had survived another assignment, and I looked forward to enjoying my hard-earned gains. Afloat in the windowless tin-can cabin of my vessel, three...